Publication


Arnaud Régnier-Loilier
How are household chores divided? Responses vary with the respondent’s gender and the partner’s presence or absence during the interview.
The Contemporary Family in France, Springer International Publishing, 2015,
URL, JabRef BibTex, Abstract
The quality of survey data depends on the way information is collected. Interviewers are instructed to ensure that the interviews take place in private without anyone else present. However, they cannot impose the interview conditions, and in many cases one or more other persons are present during all or part of the interview. This chapter compares women’s and men’s responses about the division of household tasks and seeks to measure the bias introduced by the presence of a third person (usually the respondent’s partner) during the interview. The results suggest that the partner’s presence exercises a certain “control” over the respondent’s answers, while his or her absence encourages the respondent to “idealize” by presenting a more equal division of tasks, more in keeping with a certain egalitarian standard.

Reference


@inbook{Régnier-Loilier2015d,
  author = { Arnaud Régnier-Loilier},
  title = { How are household chores divided? Responses vary with the respondent’s gender and the partner’s presence or absence during the interview.},
  year = {2015},
  booktitle = {The Contemporary Family in France},
  publisher = {Springer International Publishing},
  pages = {161-180},
  url = {http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-09528-8_8},
  timestamp = {04.12.2014},
  abstract = {The quality of survey data depends on the way information is collected. Interviewers are instructed to ensure that the interviews take place in private without anyone else present. However, they cannot impose the interview conditions, and in many cases one or more other persons are present during all or part of the interview.
This chapter compares women’s and men’s responses about the division of household tasks and seeks to measure the bias introduced by the presence of a third person (usually the respondent’s partner) during the interview. The results suggest that the partner’s presence exercises a certain “control” over the respondent’s answers, while his or her absence encourages the respondent to “idealize” by presenting a more equal division of tasks, more in keeping with a certain egalitarian standard.}
}

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