Publication


Bryndl Hohmann-Marriott
Fertility Intentions and Barriers of Women Aged 35-45 Without Children in Cross-National Comparison
Population Association of America, 2015,
URL, JabRef BibTex, Abstract
Women are postponing childbearing throughout the developed world, a phenomenon that has been termed the ‘Postponement Transition’ (Kohler, Billari, Ortega 2002). For some, postponed childbearing may be caught up at later ages, but for others fertility delayed is fertility forgone (Morgan & Taylor 2006). Identifying for whom and where this is most likely to happen is crucial, as these processes is impact population size as well as the wellbeing of nonparents, parents and their children (Mills et al. 2011). We are only beginning to understand the process by which intended fertility may or may not be realised at later ages. Those who are intentionally childfree have grown in size and social acceptability (Agrillo & Nelini 2008). For others the process of becoming childless is more gradual (Mills et al. 2011, Schmidt et al. 2012). For these women, barriers may be preventing them from realising their intended fertility. Barriers can include biological infertility, and also circumstances such as lacking a stable partner or secure financial situation (Cooke, Mills & Lavender 2012; Mills et al. 2011). Women who do not have much-wanted children experience stress and grief (Greil, Slauson-Blevins, & McQuillan 2010; Tonkin 2011). A more comprehensive understanding of the intentions and barriers of women at the end of their childbearing years who do not have children will provide information for intervening in policy and society and preventing problematic consequences. This research asks the questions: Which women aged 35-45 without children intend to have children? What barriers do these women identify? Do intentions or barriers differ by country?

Reference


@inproceedings{Hohmann-Marriott2015a,
  author = {Bryndl Hohmann-Marriott},
  title = {Fertility Intentions and Barriers of Women Aged 35-45 Without Children in Cross-National Comparison},
  year = {2015},
  publisher = {Population Association of America},
  url = {https://paa.confex.com/paa/f/brpngixpmtoe},
  timestamp = {08.06.2016},
  abstract = {Women are postponing childbearing throughout the developed world, a phenomenon that has been termed the ‘Postponement Transition’ (Kohler, Billari, Ortega 2002). For some, postponed childbearing may be caught up at later ages, but for others fertility delayed is fertility forgone (Morgan & Taylor 2006). Identifying for whom and where this is most likely to happen is crucial, as these processes is impact population size as well as the wellbeing of nonparents, parents and their children (Mills et al. 2011).
We are only beginning to understand the process by which intended fertility may or may not be realised at later ages. Those who are intentionally childfree have grown in size and social acceptability (Agrillo & Nelini 2008). For others the process of becoming childless is more gradual (Mills et al. 2011, Schmidt et al. 2012). For these women, barriers may be preventing them from realising their intended fertility. Barriers can include biological infertility, and also circumstances such as lacking a stable partner or secure financial situation (Cooke, Mills & Lavender 2012; Mills et al. 2011). Women who do not have much-wanted children experience stress and grief (Greil, Slauson-Blevins, & McQuillan 2010; Tonkin 2011). A more comprehensive understanding of the intentions and barriers of women at the end of their childbearing years who do not have children will provide information for intervening in policy and society and preventing problematic consequences.
This research asks the questions: Which women aged 35-45 without children intend to have children? What barriers do these women identify? Do intentions or barriers differ by country?}
}

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