Publication


Devolder, D.
The role of involuntary factors in explaining the gap between desired and realized fertility in developed countries
XXVI IUSSP International Population Conference 2009, 2009,
URL, JabRef BibTex, Abstract
Desired family size in low fertility countries is generally higher than the Total Fertility Rate, even after accounting for tempo changes that bias the period fertility levels downward. We use Bongaarts' framework to analyze the role of involuntary factors in the explanation of this gap. Two kinds of factors will be studied. On one hand biological factors (sterility, low fecundability, risk of miscarriage, etc.) may explain why a proportion of women who want children will remain childless or have less children than planned. On another hand social factors associated with family formation and separation risks, may also explain why final fertility levels are lower than desired one. We use data from FFS surveys and a microsimulation model in order to estimate the role of these involuntary factors in the explanation of the gap between observed and desired fertility levels.

Reference


@inproceedings{Devolder2009a,
  author = {Devolder, D.},
  title = {The role of involuntary factors in explaining the gap between desired and realized fertility in developed countries},
  year = {2009},
  booktitle = {XXVI IUSSP International Population Conference 2009},
  month = {Sep},
  url = {http://iussp2009.princeton.edu/download.aspx?submissionId=93120},
  timestamp = {28.09.2011},
  owner = {Joklova},
  language = {English},
  address = {Marrakech},
  organization = {IUSSP},
  abstract = {Desired family size in low fertility countries is generally higher than the Total Fertility Rate, even after accounting for tempo changes that bias the period fertility levels downward. We use Bongaarts' framework to analyze the role of involuntary factors in the explanation of this gap. Two kinds of factors will be studied. On one hand biological factors (sterility, low fecundability, risk of miscarriage, etc.) may explain why a proportion of women who want children will remain childless or have less children than planned. On another hand social factors associated with family formation and separation risks, may also explain why final fertility levels are lower than desired one. We use data from FFS surveys and a microsimulation model in order to estimate the role of these involuntary factors in the explanation of the gap between observed and desired fertility levels.}
}

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