Publication


Aassve, A. and Billari, F. and Spéder, Z.
Societal transition, policy changes and family formation: evidence from Hungary
European Journal of Population, 2006
hungary - transition - family formation - family policy - event history analysis
URL, DOI, JabRef BibTex, Abstract
The paper uses the Hungarian Generations and Gender Survey ‘Turning Points in the Life-course’ (HGGS) to describe recent changes in union formation, onset of childbearing, leaving home and cohabitation. By estimating survivor functions and semi-parametric hazard regression models with time-varying covariates for the timing of first union and first birth, we find a long delay among the youngest cohorts, but also remarkably strong period effects. Reduced employment, increased educational enrolment, and a higher level of uncertainty are important drivers behind these changes. Moreover, our evidence suggests that certain policy changes during the transition have exacerbated this effect, having an asymmetric impact on family formation – depending on the social status of individuals.

Reference


@article{Aassve2006a,
  author = {Aassve, A. and Billari, F. and Spéder, Z.},
  title = {Societal transition, policy changes and family formation: evidence from Hungary},
  year = {2006},
  journal = {European Journal of Population},
  volume = {22},
  number = {2},
  pages = {127-152},
  month = {Jun},
  keywords = {hungary - transition - family formation - family policy - event history analysis},
  doi = {10.1007/s10680-005-7434-2},
  url = {http://www.springerlink.com/content/d9185q3866433277},
  note = {Hungary},
  timestamp = {28.09.2011},
  owner = {Administrator},
  language = {English},
  abstract = {The paper uses the Hungarian Generations and Gender Survey ‘Turning Points in the Life-course’ (HGGS) to describe recent changes in union formation, onset of childbearing, leaving home and cohabitation. By estimating survivor functions and semi-parametric hazard regression models with time-varying covariates for the timing of first union and first birth, we find a long delay among the youngest cohorts, but also remarkably strong period effects. Reduced employment, increased educational enrolment, and a higher level of uncertainty are important drivers behind these changes. Moreover, our evidence suggests that certain policy changes during the transition have exacerbated this effect, having an asymmetric impact on family formation – depending on the social status of individuals.}
}

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