Publication


Kyzlinková, Renata and Svobodová, Kamila
Práce z domova a její zásah do rodinného života (Work from Home and its Effect on Family Life)
Fórum sociální politiky [Social Policy Forum], 2007
URL, JabRef BibTex, Abstract
The paper examines the incidence of working from home in the Czech Republic and its associations with gender, age, educational level and presence of a dependent child in the household. In addition, authors try to test certain hypotheses emerged from recent qualitative research on telework in the Czech Republic. The hypotheses are based on the assumption of household duties accumulation for the family member who works from home. According to the survey findings, 6.3% of employees and self-employed people in the Czech Republic worked at least part of the week from home. For 3% of employees and self-employed people, home was the sole place of work. The findings of the 2005 ‘Generations and gender survey’ also reveal that women in the Czech Republic probably opt to work from home for different reasons than men do. Differences between both sexes also emerge when taking into account the life cycle and career. Men usually work from home at an older age and later stage of their career while women make use of this form of work throughout their entire working life, with a slight increase in such activity among women in the 35–44 years and the oldest age group. Moreover, it appears that the presence of a dependent child in the household is a trigger for women to work from home. Regarding division of chores between partners in the household, the fact that woman works from home has no influence on her workload in household when compared to women working in one place away from home. Contrary, men working from home take an active part in household chores more often than other men.

Reference


@article{Kyzlinkova2007,
  author = {Kyzlinková, Renata and Svobodová, Kamila},
  title = {Práce z domova a její zásah do rodinného života (Work from Home and its Effect on Family Life)},
  year = {2007},
  journal = {Fórum sociální politiky [Social Policy Forum]},
  volume = {1(1)},
  pages = {11-17},
  url = {http://www.google.nl/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=8&cad=rja&ved=0CFsQFjAH&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.czech-ggs.cz%2Ffile%2F75%2Fkyzlinkova-svobodova_forum-socialni-politiky-1-2007.pdf&ei=PNnBUKeLOoPAhAfP4IGIAw&usg=AFQjCNF3R8WWDmZubd7-j4K3xCEAOt072A},
  timestamp = {03.09.2012},
  owner = {Renman},
  abstract = {The paper examines the incidence of working from home in the Czech Republic and its associations with gender, age, educational level and presence of a dependent child in the household. In addition, authors try to test certain hypotheses emerged from recent qualitative research on telework in the Czech Republic. The hypotheses are based on the assumption of household duties accumulation for the family member who works from home. According to the survey findings, 6.3% of employees and self-employed people in the Czech Republic worked at least part of the week from home. For 3% of employees and self-employed people, home was the sole place of work. The findings of the 2005 ‘Generations and gender survey’ also reveal that women in the Czech Republic probably opt to work from home for different reasons than men do. Differences between both sexes also emerge when taking into account the life cycle and career. Men usually work from home at an older age and later stage of their career while women make use of this form of work throughout their entire working life, with a slight increase in such activity among women in the 35–44 years and the oldest age group. Moreover, it appears that the presence of a dependent child in the household is a trigger for women to work from home. Regarding division of chores between partners in the household, the fact that woman works from home has no influence on her workload in household when compared to women working in one place away from home. Contrary, men working from home take an active part in household chores more often than other men.}
}

Subscribe to our Mailing List!

Fill the form below with your contact information to receive our bi-monthly GGP at a glance newsletter.