Publication


Muresan, C.
Cohabitation, an alternative for marriage in contemporary Romania: a life-table description
Demografia, 2008
URL, JabRef BibTex, Abstract
The abundance of data collected in Romania by the Generations and Gender Survey in 2005 provides the first occasion for a closer look at family-related behavioural changes in this country. Besides marriage, birth, divorce, and similar data collected in vital statistics, now we can look at entry into, exit from, and childbirth within alternative (to marriage) forms of union such as cohabitation. All these family events are interesting to study in the emerging development of the Second Demographic Transition in Romania (Mure?an 2007a). The present life table analysis may be a valuable starting point for a deeper investigation of family dynamic determinants. So far, due to the lack of adequate data, no such analysis could be made for Romania. As for methodology, the life table approach adapted by Andersson and Philipov (2002) is followed which was used on FFS data for 15 countries. Their study seems to have become a standard description technique for the more recent GGS data since the work for Bulgaria and Russia was published (Philipov and Jasilioniene 2007). We have also carried out all series of standard life tables for Romania (Mure?an 2007b)2, a work which inspired the present one. Our study is divided into six parts. Following this introduction the next parts deals with the data and methods used in this analysis. The next section looks at first union formation, with the aim to compare developments in cohabitations with those in marriages established directly. The next section is dedicated to first unions started as consensual unions, it studies the duration of cohabitation and the transformation of cohabitation from childlessness to parenthood or separation. Then the analysis applies the same framework to first marriages. In this part first, we study the duration of marriage, and then we focus on the transition to first birth or divorce. A summary section concludes the paper.

Reference


@article{Muresan2008b,
  author = {Muresan, C.},
  title = {Cohabitation, an alternative for marriage in contemporary Romania: a life-table description},
  year = {2008},
  journal = {Demografia},
  volume = {51},
  number = {5},
  pages = {36-65},
  url = {http://www.demografia.hu/letoltes/kiadvanyok/Dem_angol/2008/Muresan.pdf},
  note = {Hungary},
  timestamp = {28.09.2011},
  owner = {Andrei},
  language = {English},
  abstract = {The abundance of data collected in Romania by the Generations and Gender Survey in 2005 provides the first occasion for a closer look at family-related behavioural changes in this country. Besides marriage, birth, divorce, and similar data collected in vital statistics, now we can look at entry into, exit from, and childbirth within alternative (to marriage) forms of union such as cohabitation. All these family events are interesting to study in the emerging development of the Second Demographic Transition in Romania (Mure?an 2007a). The present life table analysis may be a valuable starting point for a deeper investigation of family dynamic determinants. So far, due to the lack of adequate data, no such analysis could be made for Romania. As for methodology, the life table approach adapted by Andersson and Philipov (2002) is followed which was used on FFS data for 15 countries. Their study seems to have become a standard description technique for the more recent GGS data since the work for Bulgaria and Russia was published (Philipov and Jasilioniene 2007). We have also carried out all series of standard life tables for Romania (Mure?an 2007b)2, a work which inspired the present one. Our study is divided into six parts. Following this introduction the next parts deals with the data and methods used in this analysis. The next section looks at first union formation, with the aim to compare developments in cohabitations with those in marriages established directly. The next section is dedicated to first unions started as consensual unions, it studies the duration of cohabitation and the transformation of cohabitation from childlessness to parenthood or separation. Then the analysis applies the same framework to first marriages. In this part first, we study the duration of marriage, and then we focus on the transition to first birth or divorce. A summary section concludes the paper.}
}

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