Publication


Muresan, C. and Hoem J. M.
The negative educational gradients in Romanian fertility
Demographic Research, 2010
educational attainment fertility relative risks romania unobserved heterogeneity
URL, DOI, JabRef BibTex, Abstract
In Western countries, rates of second and third births typically increase with educational attainment, a feature that usually disappears if unobserved heterogeneity is brought into the event-history analysis. By contrast, in a country like Romania, second and third birth rates have been found to decline when moving across groups with increasing education, and the decline becomes greater if unobserved heterogeneity is added to the analysis. The present paper demonstrates this pattern, and shows that, because this feature is retained in the presence of control variables, such as age at first birth and period effects, the selectivity is not produced by a failure to account for the control variables.

Reference


@article{Muresan2010,
  author = {Muresan, C. and Hoem J. M.},
  title = {The negative educational gradients in Romanian fertility},
  year = {2010},
  journal = {Demographic Research},
  volume = {22},
  number = {4},
  pages = {95-114},
  month = {Jan},
  keywords = {educational attainment, fertility, relative risks, romania, unobserved heterogeneity},
  doi = {10.4054/DemRes.2010.22.4},
  url = {http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol22/4/22-4.pdf},
  timestamp = {28.09.2011},
  owner = {Andrei},
  language = {English},
  abstract = {In Western countries, rates of second and third births typically increase with educational attainment, a feature that usually disappears if unobserved heterogeneity is brought into the event-history analysis. By contrast, in a country like Romania, second and third birth rates have been found to decline when moving across groups with increasing education, and the decline becomes greater if unobserved heterogeneity is added to the analysis. The present paper demonstrates this pattern, and shows that, because this feature is retained in the presence of control variables, such as age at first birth and period effects, the selectivity is not produced by a failure to account for the control variables.}
}

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