Publication


Na, E.-Y. and Duckitt, J.
Value Consensus and Diversity between Generations and Gender
Social Indicators Research, 2003
URL, DOI, JabRef BibTex, Abstract
A sample of 366 Koreans (200 younger and 166 older people) was surveyed in May 2001 to investigate consensus and diversity between generations and genders in basic values. Because prior research had indicated that rating abstract value items could produce misleading findings, concrete belief and behavioral practice items were used from which four value dimensions were extracted using principal components analysis. These were: Openness to change, Conformity and Benevolence, Exclusiveness and Self-direction, and Relationship-focused Security. Value consensus between generations and genders was found only for the Conformity and Benevolence factor, while the other three factors revealed value diversity with significant interactions between gender and generational groups. The interactions typically involved traditional gender differences in the older generation either disappearing (Openness to change, Exclusiveness and Self-direction) or being reversed (Relationship-focused security) in the younger generation. In addition, irrespective of gender, younger participants were higher in openness to change than older ones, though the difference was considerably greater for females. Discussion focused on possible reasons for these effects and their possible social implications.

Reference


@article{Na2003,
  author = {Na, E.-Y. and Duckitt, J.},
  title = {Value Consensus and Diversity between Generations and Gender},
  year = {2003},
  journal = {Social Indicators Research},
  volume = {62-63},
  number = {1-3},
  pages = {411-435},
  doi = {10.1023/A:1022665705561},
  url = {http://www.springerlink.com/content/ht01876237535320/},
  timestamp = {28.09.2011},
  owner = {Andrei},
  language = {English},
  abstract = {A sample of 366 Koreans (200 younger and 166 older people) was surveyed in May 2001 to investigate consensus and diversity between generations and genders in basic values. Because prior research had indicated that rating abstract value items could produce misleading findings, concrete belief and behavioral practice items were used from which four value dimensions were extracted using principal components analysis. These were: Openness to change, Conformity and Benevolence, Exclusiveness and Self-direction, and Relationship-focused Security. Value consensus between generations and genders was found only for the Conformity and Benevolence factor, while the other three factors revealed value diversity with significant interactions between gender and generational groups. The interactions typically involved traditional gender differences in the older generation either disappearing (Openness to change, Exclusiveness and Self-direction) or being reversed (Relationship-focused security) in the younger generation. In addition, irrespective of gender, younger participants were higher in openness to change than older ones, though the difference was considerably greater for females. Discussion focused on possible reasons for these effects and their possible social implications.}
}

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