Publication


Abuladze, L. and Rijken, A. and van Wissen, L.
Comparing the fertility patterns of first and second generation immigrant Russians in Estonia and the native populations of Estonia and Russia
First User Conference of the Generations and Gender Programme, 2011,
URL, JabRef BibTex, Abstract
Foreign-origin population fertility has usually been analysed by comparing first generation immigrants to the native population of the host country. The current study looks at the timing of first and second births, comparing four groups: first and second generation immigrant Russians in Estonia, the Estonian native population, and the Russian population in Russia – thus also incorporating second generation immigrants and the origin country population. Estonia provides an interesting case where immigration processes occurred slightly earlier than in other Western European countries, and the country has a relatively large immigrant population (with approximately 35% of the total population). The aim is to test effects of migration on fertility and to observe possible demographic convergence of immigrants’ fertility to the native population’s behaviour. One of the tested hypotheses will be socialisation hypothesis which predicts that convergence of fertility levels will be seen in the second generation in comparison to the host country population. Adaptation hypothesis predicts convergence also in the first generation. The Gender and Generation Survey data used in the current study provides an opportunity to analyse all four groups with comparable data from two countries. This also adds to the current research on the topic by using data which includes life history approach. Cox regressions models of first and second birth will be conducted, including male and female respondents from each of the four groups, born between 1924 and 1983. We take into account background characteristics such as sex, cohort, timing of migration, education and urban/rural settlement. Ethnicity of the partner is included in a separate analysis for only first and second generation immigrants.

Reference


@inproceedings{Abuladze2011,
  author = {Abuladze, L. and Rijken, A. and van Wissen, L.},
  title = {Comparing the fertility patterns of first and second generation immigrant Russians in Estonia and the native populations of Estonia and Russia},
  year = {2011},
  booktitle = {First User Conference of the Generations and Gender Programme},
  month = {May},
  url = {http://www.demografia.hu/letoltes/ggp/B2_1.pdf},
  timestamp = {28.02.2013},
  owner = {Saase},
  address = {Budapest, Hungary},
  abstract = {Foreign-origin population fertility has usually been analysed by comparing first generation immigrants to the native population of the host country. The current study looks at the timing of first and second births, comparing four groups: first and second generation immigrant Russians in Estonia, the Estonian native population, and the Russian population in Russia – thus also incorporating second generation immigrants and the origin country population. Estonia provides an interesting case where immigration processes occurred slightly earlier than in other Western European countries, and the country has a relatively large immigrant population (with approximately 35% of the total population). The aim is to test effects of migration on fertility and to observe possible demographic convergence of immigrants’ fertility to the native population’s behaviour. One of the tested hypotheses will be socialisation hypothesis which predicts that convergence of fertility levels will be seen in the second generation in comparison to the host country population. Adaptation hypothesis predicts convergence also in the first generation. The Gender and Generation Survey data used in the current study provides an opportunity to analyse all four groups with comparable data from two countries. This also adds to the current research on the topic by using data which includes life history approach. Cox regressions models of first and second birth will be conducted, including male and female respondents from each of the four groups, born between 1924 and 1983. We take into account background characteristics such as sex, cohort, timing of migration, education and urban/rural settlement. Ethnicity of the partner is included in a separate analysis for only first and second generation immigrants.}
}

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