Publication


Perelli-Harris, B. and Sigle-Rushton, W. and Lappegard, T. and Jasilioniene, A. and DiGuilio, P. and Keizer, R. and Koeppen, K. and Berghammer, C. and Kreyenfeld, M.
Examining nonmarital childbearing in Europe: How does union context differ across countries?
MPIDR Working Paper, 2009
URL, JabRef BibTex, Abstract
This study analyzes the dramatic increase in nonmarital childbearing in Europe, an increase which occurred primarily within cohabitation. Using data from 10 countries, we present descriptive trends in nonmarital childbearing from 1970 to the early 2000s. In addition, we analyze union context at conception, birth, and one year after birth. This allows for the classification of different patterns of family formation into five broad categories. We also investigate how the relationship between fertility and union status changed over time and developed along different trajectories. Our research shows that despite widespread claims that marriage is disappearing in Europe, it still remains the preferred institution for raising children.

Reference


@article{Perelli-Harris2009b,
  author = {Perelli-Harris, B. and Sigle-Rushton, W. and Lappegard, T. and Jasilioniene, A. and DiGuilio, P. and Keizer, R. and Koeppen, K. and Berghammer, C. and Kreyenfeld, M.},
  title = {Examining nonmarital childbearing in Europe: How does union context differ across countries?},
  year = {2009},
  journal = {MPIDR Working Paper},
  volume = {021},
  pages = {1-42},
  month = {Jul},
  url = {http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2009-021.pdf},
  timestamp = {28.09.2011},
  owner = {Willis-Nunez},
  language = {English},
  abstract = {This study analyzes the dramatic increase in nonmarital childbearing in Europe, an increase which occurred primarily within cohabitation. Using data from 10 countries, we present descriptive trends in nonmarital childbearing from 1970 to the early 2000s. In addition, we analyze union context at conception, birth, and one year after birth. This allows for the classification of different patterns of family formation into five broad categories. We also investigate how the relationship between fertility and union status changed over time and developed along different trajectories. Our research shows that despite widespread claims that marriage is disappearing in Europe, it still remains the preferred institution for raising children.}
}

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