Publication


Puur, A., Sakkeus,L., Põldma, A.
Intergenerational family constellations: differentials across sub-populations in the GGS countries
First User Conference of the Generations and Gender Programme, 2011,
URL, JabRef BibTex, Abstract
Research investigating the demographic foundations of family change has drawn attention to the multiple ways in which changes in mortality, fertility and nuptiality have produced major shifts in intergenerational family structures. According to a widely accepted portayal of family change during the transition to the modern demographic regime, declines in mortality and fertility have resulted in the verticalisation of family structures, in which more generations are alive but with fewer members in each generation. Drawing on the data from the first wave of the GGS, this paper is intended to complement the aforementioned body of research by providing an analysis of the variation in intergenerational family constellations across subgroups of national populations in the GGS countries. More specifically, we plan to address the following research questions: how many generations, in ascending and descending directions, surround individuals in the sub-groups of modern populations, defined by gender, educational attainment, type of settlement and majority-minority status? How common are vertically extended lineages that consist of three, four or even five family generations in these sub-groups? How many people are deprived of family, lacking inter- and/or intragenerational ties? For all independent variables, the observed patterns are linked to the variation in the underlying demographic processes. In doing so, we wish to ascertain whether the traditional social and demographic forerunners (highly educated, urban dwellers) are more advanced with respect to the verticalisation of family structures. The analysis employs descriptive and multivariate methods (logistic regression).

Reference


@inproceedings{Puur2011,
  author = {Puur, A., Sakkeus,L., Põldma, A.},
  title = {Intergenerational family constellations: differentials across sub-populations in the GGS countries},
  year = {2011},
  booktitle = {First User Conference of the Generations and Gender Programme},
  month = {May},
  url = {http://www.demografia.hu/letoltes/ggp/A2_3.pdf},
  timestamp = {28.02.2013},
  owner = {Saase},
  address = {Budapest, Hungary},
  abstract = {Research investigating the demographic foundations of family change has drawn attention to the multiple ways in which changes in mortality, fertility and nuptiality have produced major shifts in intergenerational family structures. According to a widely accepted portayal of family change during the transition to the modern demographic regime, declines in mortality and fertility have resulted in the verticalisation of family structures, in which more generations are alive but with fewer members in each generation. Drawing on the data from the first wave of the GGS, this paper is intended to complement the aforementioned body of research by providing an analysis of the variation in intergenerational family constellations across subgroups of national populations in the GGS countries. More specifically, we plan to address the following research questions: how many generations, in ascending and descending directions, surround individuals in the sub-groups of modern populations, defined by gender, educational attainment, type of settlement and majority-minority status? How common are vertically extended lineages that consist of three, four or even five family generations in these sub-groups? How many people are deprived of family, lacking inter- and/or intragenerational ties? For all independent variables, the observed patterns are linked to the variation in the underlying demographic processes. In doing so, we wish to ascertain whether the traditional social and demographic forerunners (highly educated, urban dwellers) are more advanced with respect to the verticalisation of family structures. The analysis employs descriptive and multivariate methods (logistic regression).}
}

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