Publication


Rahnu, L.
Patterns of first-union formation in Estonia: Timing of cohabitation among native and foreign-origin women
QMSS Immigration and population dynamics seminar, 2009,
URL, JabRef BibTex, Abstract
This paper presents results of the study about the patterns of first union formation in Estonia over the period of 1960-2004, among native (n=3543) and foreign-origin (n=1473) female population. The data from Estonian GGS 2004-2005 is used. Two competing processes are observed and analysed jointly - first, the transition into direct marriage and second, the transition into cohabitation. The general trend is that the standardised marriage rate falls while the intensity of forming cohabiting unions becomes a dominant form of entering into a first union. The analysis reveals that foreign-origin population experiences timing of this change 20 years later than native population. At the same time the behaviour of foreign-origin population in Estonia is in synchrony with Russia, which is a country of origin for most of those post war immigrants. The ability to distinguish population groups with different demographic behaviour is highly relevant, particularly in the country like Estonia, where the share of foreign-origin population is one third of total population. The study also poses a question about possible integration. The impact of place of birth, citizenship and language skills on partnership behaviour of immigrants was tested. Adding place of birth into proportional hazard model revealed the impact of migration experience on intensity of union formation - those who moved formed both types of unions with lower intensity. In case of other integration variables no statistically significant influence was detected. This suggests that the influence of the country of origin on demographic patterns of immigrant population is maintained over generations.

Reference


@inproceedings{Rahnu2009a,
  author = {Rahnu, L.},
  title = {Patterns of first-union formation in Estonia: Timing of cohabitation among native and foreign-origin women},
  year = {2009},
  booktitle = {QMSS Immigration and population dynamics seminar},
  month = {Jun},
  url = {http://www.ccsr.ac.uk/qmss/seminars/2009-06-03/documents/PaperRahnu.pdf},
  timestamp = {28.09.2011},
  owner = {UTENTE},
  language = {English},
  address = {Jevnaker, Norway},
  abstract = {This paper presents results of the study about the patterns of first union formation in Estonia over the period of 1960-2004, among native (n=3543) and foreign-origin (n=1473) female population. The data from Estonian GGS 2004-2005 is used. Two competing processes are observed and analysed jointly - first, the transition into direct marriage and second, the transition into cohabitation. The general trend is that the standardised marriage rate falls while the intensity of forming cohabiting unions becomes a dominant form of entering into a first union. The analysis reveals that foreign-origin population experiences timing of this change 20 years later than native population. At the same time the behaviour of foreign-origin population in Estonia is in synchrony with Russia, which is a country of origin for most of those post war immigrants. The ability to distinguish population groups with different demographic behaviour is highly relevant, particularly in the country like Estonia, where the share of foreign-origin population is one third of total population. The study also poses a question about possible integration. The impact of place of birth, citizenship and language skills on partnership behaviour of immigrants was tested. Adding place of birth into proportional hazard model revealed the impact of migration experience on intensity of union formation - those who moved formed both types of unions with lower intensity. In case of other integration variables no statistically significant influence was detected. This suggests that the influence of the country of origin on demographic patterns of immigrant population is maintained over generations.}
}

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