Publication


Rahnu, L. and Puur, A. and Stanküniené, V. and Zakharov, S. and Maslauskaite, A.
Changing mode of first union formation in the countries of Eastern Europe: the significance of less and more distant demographic divides
First User Conference of the Generations and Gender Programme, 2011,
URL, JabRef BibTex, Abstract
The Gender and Generation Surveys from seven East European countries – Bulgaria, Estonia, Lithuania, Georgia, Hungary, Romania, and Russia – are used to analyze the change in the patterns of first union formation since the 1960s. The experience of the latter countries is compared to four West European countries over the same period (Austria, Germany, France and Norway). These two groupings of countries represent the opposite sides of the divide that split Europe from the aftermath of the WWII till the turn of the 1990s. On the other hand, the same countries are traversed by a more distant demographic cleavage – the Hajnal line – which reflects the spread of nuptiality patterns that persisted in Europe until the mid-20th century. To investigate the implications of these two partly overlapping divides, we use intensity regression to model cohabitation and marriage as competing risks at the entry into first union, and further, the rate of converting consensual unions into marriage. We aim to ascertain the calendar periods in which cohabitation has become a dominant pathway towards first union formation, and note that there is up to thirty years’ difference among the countries for that shift to occur. From a complementary angle, we seek to identify birth cohorts which have accomplished the corresponding shift in partnership patterns in various countries. Finally, we discuss whether cohabitation appears a West European phenomenon that started to diffuse to other countries following the transformation of their political and economic systems, or rather, does its spread echo a more distant demographic divide.

Reference


@inproceedings{Rahnu2011,
  author = {Rahnu, L. and Puur, A. and Stanküniené, V. and Zakharov, S. and Maslauskaite, A.},
  title = {Changing mode of first union formation in the countries of Eastern Europe: the significance of less and more distant demographic divides},
  year = {2011},
  booktitle = {First User Conference of the Generations and Gender Programme},
  month = {May},
  url = {http://www.demografia.hu/letoltes/ggp/B6_2.pdf},
  timestamp = {28.02.2013},
  owner = {Saase},
  address = {Budapest, Hungary},
  abstract = {The Gender and Generation Surveys from seven East European countries – Bulgaria, Estonia, Lithuania, Georgia, Hungary, Romania, and Russia – are used to analyze the change in the patterns of first union formation since the 1960s. The experience of the latter countries is compared to four West European countries over the same period (Austria, Germany, France and Norway). These two groupings of countries represent the opposite sides of the divide that split Europe from the aftermath of the WWII till the turn of the 1990s. On the other hand, the same countries are traversed by a more distant demographic cleavage – the Hajnal line – which reflects the spread of nuptiality patterns that persisted in Europe until the mid-20th century. To investigate the implications of these two partly overlapping divides, we use intensity regression to model cohabitation and marriage as competing risks at the entry into first union, and further, the rate of converting consensual unions into marriage. We aim to ascertain the calendar periods in which cohabitation has become a dominant pathway towards first union formation, and note that there is up to thirty years’ difference among the countries for that shift to occur. From a complementary angle, we seek to identify birth cohorts which have accomplished the corresponding shift in partnership patterns in various countries. Finally, we discuss whether cohabitation appears a West European phenomenon that started to diffuse to other countries following the transformation of their political and economic systems, or rather, does its spread echo a more distant demographic divide.}
}

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