Publication


Rieck, Dorothea
The influences of social and economic conditions on fertility intentions of Russian men
European Population Conference 2006, European Association for Population Studies, 2006,
URL, JabRef BibTex, Abstract
Since the beginning of the political and economic transition in Russia, significant changes in demographic behavior have been observed. A dramatic decline of the Total Fertility Rate (TFR), a decrease in the numbers of marriages, and an increase of cohabitations and extra marital births are the main aspects of the change in family formation behavior. After 1990, many Russian households experienced substantial economic hardships and uncertainties. It is argued that the economic downturn has become one of the major factors responsible for the significant decline of Russian TFR. The focus of this study is the analysis of childbirth intentions of Russian men. Men’s intentions to have children differ from those of women in many ways. Usually men must bear the financial burden of the family and thus have a different economic perspective. We use the Russian Generations and Gender Survey (GGS) which was conducted in 2004. It contains information about demographic indicators, the economic situation as well as family planning intentions. To analyze the data we apply a logistic regression. One of our main findings is an enormous difference between the influences on men’s intentions to have a first or a subsequent child. Whereas economic factors have only little impact on the desire to have a first child, they are the decisive factors for the decision to have a second or subsequent child. For men with at least one child we show that the objective economic situation, as well as its subjective perception, has a strong positive influence on the intention to have another child. For childless respondents we do not find such an effect. We assume that for the transition to the first child, economic circumstances play a smaller role than do emotional, mental, or normative factors

Reference


@inproceedings{Rieck2006b,
  author = {Rieck, Dorothea},
  title = {The influences of social and economic conditions on fertility intentions of Russian men},
  year = {2006},
  booktitle = {European Population Conference 2006},
  publisher = {European Association for Population Studies},
  month = {Jun},
  url = {http://epc2006.princeton.edu/download.aspx?submissionId=60160},
  note = {Germany},
  timestamp = {28.09.2011},
  owner = {Administrator},
  language = {English},
  address = {Liverpool},
  abstract = {Since the beginning of the political and economic transition in Russia, significant changes in demographic behavior have been observed. A dramatic decline of the Total Fertility Rate (TFR), a decrease in the numbers of marriages, and an increase of cohabitations and extra marital births are the main aspects of the change in family formation behavior. After 1990, many Russian households experienced substantial economic hardships and uncertainties. It is argued that the economic downturn has become one of the major factors responsible for the significant decline of Russian TFR. The focus of this study is the analysis of childbirth intentions of Russian men. Men’s intentions to have children differ from those of women in many ways. Usually men must bear the financial burden of the family and thus have a different economic perspective. We use the Russian Generations and Gender Survey (GGS) which was conducted in 2004. It contains information about demographic indicators, the economic situation as well as family planning intentions. To analyze the data we apply a logistic regression. One of our main findings is an enormous difference between the influences on men’s intentions to have a first or a subsequent child. Whereas economic factors have only little impact on the desire to have a first child, they are the decisive factors for the decision to have a second or subsequent child. For men with at least one child we show that the objective economic situation, as well as its subjective perception, has a strong positive influence on the intention to have another child. For childless respondents we do not find such an effect. We assume that for the transition to the first child, economic circumstances play a smaller role than do emotional, mental, or normative factors}
}

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