Publication


Claire Scodellaro and Myriam Khlat and Florence Jusot
Intergenerational financial transfers and health in a national sample from France
Social Science & Medicine, 2012
URL, JabRef BibTex, Abstract
Financial transfers from parents to their adult children are a growing trend in contemporary societies, and this study investigates the relation of those transfers to their beneficiaries' health in France. In the 2005 nationally representative Gender and Generation Survey, nearly 6% of the subjects aged 25–49 years reported having received financial transfers during the last 12 months. Subjects who had achieved intergenerational upward mobility as well as those who had remained in the upper class were more likely to receive transfers, suggesting that parents rewarded those of their children who achieved most social success. After adjusting for a wide range of socio-demographic factors, subjects who had been given large transfers were much more likely to report very good health than subjects who had not been given anything. Findings were interpreted within the framework of sociological research on intergenerational transfers and that of lifecourse epidemiology.

Reference


@article{Scodellaro2012,
  author = {Claire Scodellaro and Myriam Khlat and Florence Jusot},
  title = {Intergenerational financial transfers and health in a national sample from France},
  year = {2012},
  journal = {Social Science & Medicine},
  volume = {75(7)},
  pages = {1296-1302},
  url = {http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0277953612004194},
  timestamp = {03.09.2012},
  owner = {Renman},
  abstract = {Financial transfers from parents to their adult children are a growing trend in contemporary societies, and this study investigates the relation of those transfers to their beneficiaries' health in France. In the 2005 nationally representative Gender and Generation Survey, nearly 6% of the subjects aged 25–49 years reported having received financial transfers during the last 12 months. Subjects who had achieved intergenerational upward mobility as well as those who had remained in the upper class were more likely to receive transfers, suggesting that parents rewarded those of their children who achieved most social success. After adjusting for a wide range of socio-demographic factors, subjects who had been given large transfers were much more likely to report very good health than subjects who had not been given anything. Findings were interpreted within the framework of sociological research on intergenerational transfers and that of lifecourse epidemiology.}
}

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