Publication


Sunnee Billingsley and Anna Matysiak
Social Capillarity Revisited: The Relationship between Social Mobility and Fertility
Demography Unit Stockholm, 2012
URL, JabRef BibTex, Abstract
This study revives the debate over the influence of social mobility on fertility and addresses whether omitted conditioning factors to this relationship contributed to the unresolved state of the literature. We locate this study in Poland and Russia and compare relationships across the transition from communism and in different economic contexts. Theoretically, this study distinguishes between structural and individual determinants of mobility as well as status enhancement and relative economic status mechanisms. Applying event-history analysis techniques to longitudinal micro-data, we find strong evidence that fertility is related to mobility and that there are important conditioning factors; the mechanisms at work appear to be moderated by both the economic and institutional context. Status enhancement aims link mobility to fertility for women and both economic context and weak institutional support for working mothers moderate this relationship. In contrast, the relative economic status effect appears for men in a context of economic growth. The relationship between mobility and fertility is therefore comprised of structural and individual components. …

Reference


@article{Billingsley2012a,
  author = {Sunnee Billingsley and Anna Matysiak},
  title = {Social Capillarity Revisited: The Relationship between Social Mobility and Fertility},
  year = {2012},
  journal = {Demography Unit Stockholm},
  institution = {Stockholm University},
  number = {13},
  url = {http://www.suda.su.se/SRRD/SRRD_2012_13.pdf},
  timestamp = {14.05.2013},
  owner = {Coleman},
  abstract = {This study revives the debate over the influence of social mobility on fertility and addresses whether omitted conditioning factors to this relationship contributed to the unresolved state of the literature. We locate this study in Poland and Russia and compare relationships across the transition from communism and in different economic contexts. Theoretically, this study distinguishes between structural and individual determinants of mobility as well as status enhancement and relative economic status mechanisms. Applying event-history analysis techniques to longitudinal micro-data, we find strong evidence that fertility is related to mobility and that there are important conditioning factors; the mechanisms at work appear to be moderated by both the economic and institutional context. Status enhancement aims link mobility to fertility for women and both economic context and weak institutional support for working mothers moderate this relationship. In contrast, the relative economic status effect appears for men in a context of economic growth. The relationship between mobility and fertility is therefore comprised of structural and individual components. …}
}

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