Publication


Sunnee Billingsley and Luule Sakkeus and Allan Puur
Jobs, Careers, and Becoming a Parent under State Socialist and Free Market Conditions
Stockholm University Linnaeus Center on Social Policy and Family Dynamics in Europe, SPaDE, Working Paper, 2012
URL, JabRef BibTex, Abstract
This study explores how the relationship between employment and the timing of parenthood changes under conditions of state socialism and a free market economy. Specifically, labor market entrance, duration and career establishment are related to the timing of parenthood over two very different economic contexts—before Estonia’s independence from the Soviet Union and after 1991. The transition to a market economy was accompanied by both greater employment insecurity and opportunities, which were distributed unevenly over the population. We focus on gender and nativity status as two stratifiers in the labor market. Men have postponed parenthood to a greater degree than women, and non-native origin women have postponed parenthood the least of all. Hazard models reveal that in the market economy, it is equally important for women and men to achieve their own security and tenure in the labor market before becoming parents. The importance of an established position in the labor market, measured through tenure and achieving one’s main occupation, also acquire importance to entering parenthood in the market economy. However, non-native origin men and women’s timing appears to have become detached from their career developments, which is interpreted as possible evidence of different age norms.

Reference


@techreport{Billingsley2012,
  author = {Sunnee Billingsley and Luule Sakkeus and Allan Puur},
  title = {Jobs, Careers, and Becoming a Parent under State Socialist and Free Market Conditions},
  year = {2012},
  journal = {Stockholm University Linnaeus Center on Social Policy and Family Dynamics in Europe, SPaDE, Working Paper},
  volume = {6},
  institution = {Stockholm University Linnaeus Center on Social Policy and Family Dynamics in Europe, SPaDE},
  number = {6},
  pages = {30},
  url = {http://www.su.se/polopoly_fs/1.95430.1342039972!/menu/standard/file/WP_2012_6.pdf},
  timestamp = {03.09.2012},
  owner = {Renman},
  abstract = {This study explores how the relationship between employment and the timing of parenthood changes under conditions of state socialism and a free market economy. Specifically, labor market entrance, duration and career establishment are related to the timing of parenthood over two very different economic contexts—before Estonia’s independence from the Soviet Union and after 1991. The transition to a market economy was accompanied by both greater employment insecurity and opportunities, which were distributed unevenly over the population. We focus on gender and nativity status as two stratifiers in the labor market. Men have postponed parenthood to a greater degree than women, and non-native origin women have postponed parenthood the least of all. Hazard models reveal that in the market economy, it is equally important for women and men to achieve their own security and tenure in the labor market before becoming parents. The importance of an established position in the labor market, measured through tenure and achieving one’s main occupation, also acquire importance to entering parenthood in the market economy. However, non-native origin men and women’s timing appears to have become detached from their career developments, which is interpreted as possible evidence of different age norms.}
}

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