Publication


Wengler, A.
The influence of immigrant status on health. Exploring the subjective health status of first and second generation Turkish immigrants in Germany.
GK Soclife Working Papers, 2010
URL, JabRef BibTex, Abstract
Using data from the Generations and Gender Survey (GGS), the health status of Turkish immigrants in Germany is observed in this paper. The GGS includes approximately 10,000 German natives (surveyed in 2005) and 4,000 Turkish immigrants (surveyed in 2006) living in Germany. Logistic regression models are estimated to compare the health of first and second generation Turkish immigrants to that of German natives. Differences in health are clear and, contrary to the expectations derived from existing literature, Turkish immigrants do not seem to be in worse health than the native German population when different variables are taken into account. Especially when socio-economic status and coping resources are considered, migrant status has no significant effect on the subjective health status. Furthermore, Turkish immigrants are, to some extent healthier than their German counterparts when variations between East and West Germany are taken into account. Additionally, separate models for Turkish immigrants and German natives are estimated, and it can be shown that Turkish immigrants who have lived in Germany for a shorter period of time (as it is the case in East Germany) have a health advantage.

Reference


@article{Wengler2010,
  author = {Wengler, A.},
  title = {The influence of immigrant status on health. Exploring the subjective health status of first and second generation Turkish immigrants in Germany.},
  year = {2010},
  journal = {GK Soclife Working Papers},
  volume = {5},
  pages = {16},
  url = {http://www.wiso.uni-koeln.de/fileadmin/wiso_fak/gk_soclife/pdf/Working_papers/AWengler_2010_ssrn.pdf},
  timestamp = {12.04.2012},
  owner = {Barbuscia},
  abstract = {Using data from the Generations and Gender Survey (GGS), the health status of Turkish immigrants in Germany is observed in this paper. The GGS includes approximately 10,000 German natives (surveyed in 2005) and 4,000 Turkish immigrants (surveyed in 2006) living in Germany. Logistic regression models are estimated to compare the health of first and second generation Turkish immigrants to that of German natives. Differences in health are clear and, contrary to the expectations derived from existing literature, Turkish immigrants do not seem to be in worse health than the native German population when different variables are taken into account. Especially when socio-economic status and coping resources are considered, migrant status has no significant effect on the subjective health status. Furthermore, Turkish immigrants are, to some extent healthier than their German counterparts when variations between East and West Germany are taken into account. Additionally, separate models for Turkish immigrants and German natives are estimated, and it can be shown that Turkish immigrants who have lived in Germany for a shorter period of time (as it is the case in East Germany) have a health advantage.}
}

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