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2014

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2013

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2012

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GGP at a Glance No. 16 / June 2014

In most countries, cohabitors report lower levels of relationship quality as compared to married couples.
However, the quality gap (between cohabitors and married people) is largest in countries where
cohabitation is less prevalent. Cross-national differences in the acceptance and prevalence of cohabitation
may therefore have an influence on how cohabitators perceive the quality of their relationship.
It may contribute to making them more, or less, similar to married people.

The GGP is now over 14 years old and yet it continues to grow with the release of new data and an ever increasing number of users. Did you know that the number of users of the GGP has grown by 33% in the last 12 months alone and recently passed the 2,000 mark? This number is expected to continue to increase over the next year as data from the Austria, Czech Republic, Italy, Russia and Sweden is made available to users. The use of the GGP by the research community is further evidenced by the number of presentations at this month’s European Population Conference where 45 presentations will draw on GGP data as well as a further 16 posters. The number of studies based on GGP data in top journals also continues to increase as can be seen on page 2 where a handful of recent articles are detailed.

Registered users of the Generations and Gender Program in 2014

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GGP at a Glance No. 15 / April 2014

In most countries, cohabitors report lower levels of relationship quality as compared to married couples.
However, the quality gap (between cohabitors and married people) is largest in countries where
cohabitation is less prevalent. Cross-national differences in the acceptance and prevalence of cohabitation
may therefore have an influence on how cohabitators perceive the quality of their relationship.
It may contribute to making them more, or less, similar to married people.

One of the main subjects covered in the Generations and Gender Programme (GGP) is the interaction between work and family life. The graph below shows that maternal employment varies considerably across European Countries. These differences could be caused by a large variety of social, economic or cultural factors. The GGP is an invaluable tool for exploring this as it is the only data source that covers such a diverse range of indicators including values and attitudes, the distribution of household work, childcare availability and usage, policy indicators, work and educational histories, financial circumstances, social networks, housing conditions and the respondents beliefs, intentions andexpectations. These indicators, combined with the longitudinal and comparative design of the survey, make the GGP uniquely positioned to answer many pressing questions.

Percentage of Mothers with Children under 3 who are employed

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GGP at a Glance No. 14 / February 2014

In most countries, cohabitors report lower levels of relationship quality as compared to married couples.
However, the quality gap (between cohabitors and married people) is largest in countries where
cohabitation is less prevalent. Cross-national differences in the acceptance and prevalence of cohabitation
may therefore have an influence on how cohabitators perceive the quality of their relationship.
It may contribute to making them more, or less, similar to married people.

The GGP now has an interactive bibliography that makes it possible for data users to submit their own publications, presentations and papers. We hope that this will make it easier to record and keep track of publications using GGP data. This is vital in demonstrating the value of the GGP to stakeholders and funding agencies. We would therefore be very grateful if you could take a few minutes to check whether we have recorded all your theses, papers, presentations, dissertations, reports and book chapters. If any are missing then you can log in to the GGP website and add whatever is missing. This will help ensure we are measuring the full extent of the GGP’s impact.

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GGP at a Glance No. 13 / December 2013

In most countries, cohabitors report lower levels of relationship quality as compared to married couples.
However, the quality gap (between cohabitors and married people) is largest in countries where
cohabitation is less prevalent. Cross-national differences in the acceptance and prevalence of cohabitation
may therefore have an influence on how cohabitators perceive the quality of their relationship.
It may contribute to making them more, or less, similar to married people.

The longitudinal design is a key aspect of the Generations and Gender Survey. As more wave 2 data becomes available, researchers are able to take advantage of the many benefits that longitudinal data brings. One of these advantages is the ability to observe events such as the birth of a child. The figure below illustrates that the percentage of women aged 20-35 who had a child between wave 1 & 2 varies considerably across countries. Due to the vast array of variables contained in the data, researchers will be able to investigate whether this is due to differing social norms, institutional constraints or some other factors. As we enter 2014, the GGP aims to release more and more wave 2 data to the public and support this longitudinal, comparative analysis.

Fertility between Waves 1 & 2 in the GGP

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GGP at a Glance No. 12 / October 2013

In most countries, cohabitors report lower levels of relationship quality as compared to married couples.
However, the quality gap (between cohabitors and married people) is largest in countries where
cohabitation is less prevalent. Cross-national differences in the acceptance and prevalence of cohabitation
may therefore have an influence on how cohabitators perceive the quality of their relationship.
It may contribute to making them more, or less, similar to married people.

This issue marks the launch of Wave 1 data from Poland. This adds yet another post-communist country to the GGP alongside Bulgaria, Georgia, Hungary, Lithuania, Romania and Russia. Poland is well known as having a unique attitude towards organised religion among these countries given its strong Catholic Identity. The graph below supports this as it shows that the large majority of Polish people have attended a religious ceremony in the last month. This religiosity may have considerable consequences for demographic behaviour as evidenced here where there appears to be a strong relationship between attending religious services and individuals cohabiting outside of marriage.

Religious Service Attendence and Cohabitation outside of Marriage

Graph

GGP at a Glance No. 11 / August 2013

In most countries, cohabitors report lower levels of relationship quality as compared to married couples.
However, the quality gap (between cohabitors and married people) is largest in countries where
cohabitation is less prevalent. Cross-national differences in the acceptance and prevalence of cohabitation
may therefore have an influence on how cohabitators perceive the quality of their relationship.
It may contribute to making them more, or less, similar to married people.

You may know that loneliness is more prevalent amongst older people than younger people but did you know that loneliness levels also vary across countries? Data from the GGP illustrate that both older and younger age groups show higher levels of loneliness in Eastern Europe than those in Western Europe. Eastern European societies have experienced rapid societal and economic changes. These have often resulted in increased economic inequalities, poverty and psychological stress, each affecting the risks for loneliness.

Loneliness on the De Jong Gierveld Short Scale across 7 Countries

Glance011_-_Graphic

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GGP at a Glance No. 10 / June 2013

In most countries, cohabitors report lower levels of relationship quality as compared to married couples.
However, the quality gap (between cohabitors and married people) is largest in countries where
cohabitation is less prevalent. Cross-national differences in the acceptance and prevalence of cohabitation
may therefore have an influence on how cohabitators perceive the quality of their relationship.
It may contribute to making them more, or less, similar to married people.

Strong family ties can diminish people’s likelihood of having depressive feelings by providing material and non-material resources. Having both parents alive, having not experienced the divorce of one’s parents, and having siblings were all found to reduce the risk of having a depressive mood. Being married was found to have a particularly protective effect (after controlling for education, employment status, and financial situation). Moreover, this effect was found to be stronger in Eastern than in Western European countries suggesting that a more supportive welfare state can buffer the impact of not being married on one’s depressive mood.

Impact of marital status on the likelihood of having a depressive mood among adults age 18-79 in Eastern and Western European countries

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GGP at a Glance No. 09 / April 2013

In most countries, cohabitors report lower levels of relationship quality as compared to married couples.
However, the quality gap (between cohabitors and married people) is largest in countries where
cohabitation is less prevalent. Cross-national differences in the acceptance and prevalence of cohabitation
may therefore have an influence on how cohabitators perceive the quality of their relationship.
It may contribute to making them more, or less, similar to married people.
In most countries, cohabitors report lower levels of relationship quality as compared to married couples.However, the quality gap (between cohabitors and married people) is largest in countries wherecohabitation is less prevalent. Cross-national differences in the acceptance and prevalence of cohabitationmay therefore have an influence on how cohabitators perceive the quality of their relationship.It may contribute to making them more, or less, similar to married people.

Prevalence of cohabitors and relationship quality gap between cohabitors and married people (age 18 to 55)

GGP_AT_A_GLANCE_009_April-2013-img1

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GGP at a Glance No. 08 / February 2013

The presence of children is associated with greater inequality in the gender division of housework among couples in France, western Germany, and eastern Germany. In all three cases, couples with children share housework tasks less equally than their childless equivalent. However, major cross-national differences exist when it comes to the age of children. While in western Germany the inequality is largest when young children are present, and slightly improves thereafter, the exact opposite pattern is observed in France.

Gender division of housework by age of the youngest child

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GGP at a Glance No. 07 / December 2012

Since the year 2000, a total of about 680 papers or reports based on GGS data have been published or presented at conferences. This includes more than 200 articles in scientific journals and 21 PhD theses. As of 2012, the GGP counts close to 600 registered projects, up from 100 in 2009!

Number of bibliographical units using GGP as the data source

Number of bibliographical units using GGP as the data source

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GGP at a Glance No. 06 / November 2012

In addition to providing individual-level survey data, the Generations and Gender Programme (GGP) offers contextual data on demographic, social and economic conditions at the national and regional levels for up to 60 countries. These data are available in the GGP Contextual Database, which is integrated into the GGP web page. The GGP Contextual Database enhances the analytical potential of the Generations and Gender Survey by enabling users to link individual-level behaviour with information about the context in which the individual is embedded. The database is designed to support research into micro-macro links at the intersection of demographic and social science research. In addition, researchers interested in studying macro-level trends can also benefit from the data available in the GGP Contextual Database. The database is co-ordinated by the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research in Rostock, Germany.

Main Contextual Database interface: Example

Main Contextual Database interface: Example

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GGP at a Glance No. 05 / October 2012

Receiving childcare help from grandparents has a positive and significant impact on mothers’ labour force participation in some countries (Bulgaria, Germany and Hungary) but not in others. Findings thus suggest a complex interaction between formal and informl childcare, national context, and fertility decisions. Moreover, controlling for the endogeneity of grandparents’ childcare provision through the use of instrumental variables reveals considerable biases as compared to a “naive” probit model.

Estimated marginal effect of grandparents’ childcare provision on mothers’ labour supply a

Estimated marginal effect of grandparents’ childcare provision on mothers’ labour supply

a: Estimated with a bivariate probit model, marginal effects after controlling for age, education, number and age of children.
- statistically not significant result; - statistically significant result

Source: Aassve, A., Arpino, B., Goisis, A. (2012). Grandparenting and mothers’ labour force participation : a comparative analysis using the Generations and Gender Survey. Demographic Research. 27, 3: 53—84.

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GGP at a Glance No. 04 / September 2012

The GGP NESSTAR Online Access enables searching, browsing and analyzing Generation and Gender Survey (GGS) data and metadata without the user having to access the micro-data files directly. The NESSTAR interface consists in an intuitive user-friendly analytical tool that allows visualizing data with tables and graphs as well as performing basic statistical analyses. Researchers, students, journalists, policy makers, and anyone interested can easily obtain a comprehensive overview of GGS data and metadata. The interface is maintained by the Survey Department of the “Institut national d’études démographiques” (INED, France).

Main NESSTAR interface: Example

NESSTAR interface

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GGP at a Glance No. 03 / August 2012

Both filial responsibility norms (from adult children to their elderly parents) and parental responsibility norms (from elderly parents to their grown-up children) display a clear East-West gradient. The gradient is however steeper in the case of filial norms. In both cases, the support for family norms is lower in Norway and higher in Georgia. In the North-west European countries, filial norms were moreover found to have a more open character in that adult children are expected to help older parents in case of need, but not necessarily to adjust their working lives to their parents’ needs. Stronger, and more unconditional norms, were instead observed in Eastern Europe.

Average value of the index of filial responsibility and the index of parental responsibility in seven European countries a

Average value of the index of filial responsibility and the index of parental responsibility in seven European countries

a: Mean score of a two-item index with each item measured from '0'(totally disagree) to '4(totally agree). A higher score thus indicates a stronger support for filial/parental obligations.

Source: Daatland, S.O., Herlofson, K., Lima, I.A. (2011). Balancing generations: on the strength and character of family norms in the West and East of Europe. Ageing & Society, 31 (7): 1159—1179.

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GGP at a Glance No. 02 / July 2012

Both social pressure and emotional support (as a form of social capital) influence the likelihood of intending to have a second or third child. Being exposed to higher social pressure consequently results in a higher predicted probability of intending to have a child. The probability is however higher for men in France than in Bulgaria or Germany.

Predicted probability of intending to have a second or third child for men

Predicted probability of intending to have a second or third child for men

Source: Balbo, N. & Mills, M (2011). The effects of social capital and social pressure on the intention to have a second or third child in France, Germany, and Bulgaria, 2004–05. Population Studies, 65 (3), 335-351.

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GGP at a Glance No. 01 / June 2012

Among young adults age 20 to 39 years old, more than 40 percent have at least one biological grandparent who is still alive. Inversely, among older adults age 60 to 79 years old, around 80% have at least one grandchild. Increasing longevity and low fertility exert opposite effect on the availability of kins and on the prevalence of multigenerational families.

Availability of different types of biological kin (%) by age group

Availability of different types of biological kin (%) by age group

Source: Puur, A., Sakkeus, L., Põldma, A., & Herm, A. (2011). Intergenerational family constellations in contemporary Europe: Evidence from the Generations and Gender Survey. Demographic Research, 25(4), 135-172.

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