Publication


Kathleen L. McGinn, Mayra Ruiz Castro, and Elizabeth Long Lingo
Learning from mum: Cross-national evidence linking maternal employment and adult children’s outcomes
Work, Employment and Society, 2018
URL, JabRef BibTex, Abstract
Analyses relying on two international surveys from over 100,000 men and women across 29 countries explore the relationship between maternal employment and adult daughters’ and sons’ employment and domestic outcomes. In the employment sphere, adult daughters, but not sons, of employed mothers are more likely to be employed and, if employed, are more likely to hold supervisory responsibility, work more hours and earn higher incomes than their peers whose mothers were not employed. In the domestic sphere, sons raised by employed mothers spend more time caring for family members and daughters spend less time on housework. Analyses provide evidence for two mechanisms: gender attitudes and social learning. Finally, findings show contextual influences at the family and societal levels: family-of-origin social class moderates effects of maternal employment and childhood exposure to female employment within society can substitute for the influence of maternal employment on daughters and reinforce its influence on sons.

Reference


@article{McGinn2018a,
  author = {Kathleen L. McGinn, Mayra Ruiz Castro, and Elizabeth Long Lingo},
  title = {Learning from mum: Cross-national evidence linking maternal employment and adult children’s outcomes},
  year = {2018},
  journal = {Work, Employment and Society},
  url = {https://doi.org/10.1177/0950017018760167},
  timestamp = {13.11.2018},
  abstract = {Analyses relying on two international surveys from over 100,000 men and women across 29 countries explore the relationship between maternal employment and adult daughters’ and sons’ employment and domestic outcomes. In the employment sphere, adult daughters, but not sons, of employed mothers are more likely to be employed and, if employed, are more likely to hold supervisory responsibility, work more hours and earn higher incomes than their peers whose mothers were not employed. In the domestic sphere, sons raised by employed mothers spend more time caring for family members and daughters spend less time on housework. Analyses provide evidence for two mechanisms: gender attitudes and social learning. Finally, findings show contextual influences at the family and societal levels: family-of-origin social class moderates effects of maternal employment and childhood exposure to female employment within society can substitute for the influence of maternal employment on daughters and reinforce its influence on sons.}
}
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