Publication


Marc Luy, Paola Di Giulio and Graziella Caselli
Differences in life expectancy by education and occupation in Italy, 1980-94: indirect estimates from maternal and paternal orphanhood
Population Studies, 2011
URL, JabRef BibTex, Abstract
In the present study, we use the modified orphanhood method to analyse mortality differences by socio-economic status in Italy. This technique permits the indirect estimation of adult mortality from survey-based information on parents' survival in developed populations and helps to overcome several limitations of conventional studies on mortality differences by social class. We estimate a time series of life tables by education and occupation and analyse the differences in life expectancy by socio-economic status along with their changes between 1980–84, 1985–89, and 1990–94. Whereas mortality differences between the highest social class and the other socio-economic status groups increased among men, they decreased among women. We speculate about the reasons for these sex-specific trends and evaluate the application of indirect estimation techniques to the populations of developed countries.

Reference


@article{Luy2011a,
  author = {Marc Luy, Paola Di Giulio and Graziella Caselli},
  title = {Differences in life expectancy by education and occupation in Italy, 1980-94: indirect estimates from maternal and paternal orphanhood},
  year = {2011},
  journal = {Population Studies},
  volume = {65},
  number = {2},
  pages = {137-155},
  url = {https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00324728.2011.568192},
  timestamp = {13.03.2020},
  abstract = {In the present study, we use the modified orphanhood method to analyse mortality differences by socio-economic status in Italy. This technique permits the indirect estimation of adult mortality from survey-based information on parents' survival in developed populations and helps to overcome several limitations of conventional studies on mortality differences by social class. We estimate a time series of life tables by education and occupation and analyse the differences in life expectancy by socio-economic status along with their changes between 1980–84, 1985–89, and 1990–94. Whereas mortality differences between the highest social class and the other socio-economic status groups increased among men, they decreased among women. We speculate about the reasons for these sex-specific trends and evaluate the application of indirect estimation techniques to the populations of developed countries.}
}
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