Publication


Tomas Sobotka
Fertility in Austria, Germany and Switzerland: is there a common pattern?
Comparative Population Studies – Zeitschrift für Bevölkerungswissenschaft, 2012
URL, JabRef BibTex, Abstract
This article reviews major similarities and differences in period and co-hort fertility in Austria, Germany and Switzerland. These three countries share a long history of low fertility and currently belong to countries with the lowest cohort fertility rates globally. The study highlights persistent differences in fertility and family patterns between Eastern and Western Germany, which are often rooted in pre-unifi cation contrasts and can be partly linked to continuing differences in insti-tutional set-up and norms on organised childcare, living arrangements and maternal employment. The remarkable stability in period fertility over the last 30 years (with the exception of Eastern Germany) is illustrated with various indicators and dis-cussed on the backdrop of recent reversals in European fer tilit y trends. This st abilit y in fertility levels contrasts with the long-term shift in childbearing towards less sta-ble living arrangements (especially in Eastern Germany), including a high share of single mothers. The study also discusses a relatively small but persistent negative impact of the ongoing shift towards a late timing of childbearing on period fertility in the region. It highlights the educational gradient in fertility, which can be largely attributed to elevated childlessness rates among women with a higher educational degree. Migrant women have on average higher fertility rates than “native-born” women, but their net positive impact on aggregate fertility rates has diminished over time and has become negligible in Germany. A concluding discussion suggest s that Austria, Germany and Switzerland share a common pattern of low fertility that sets these countries apart from other regions in Europe

Reference


@article{Sobotka2012a,
  author = {Tomas Sobotka},
  title = {Fertility in Austria, Germany and Switzerland: is there a common pattern?},
  year = {2012},
  journal = {Comparative Population Studies – Zeitschrift für Bevölkerungswissenschaft},
  volume = { 36},
  number = {2-3},
  pages = {263-304},
  url = {https://www.comparativepopulationstudies.de/index.php/CPoS/issue/view/10},
  timestamp = {16.03.2020},
  abstract = {This article reviews major similarities and differences in period and co-hort  fertility  in  Austria,  Germany  and  Switzerland.  These  three  countries  share  a  long history of low fertility and currently belong to countries with the lowest cohort fertility  rates  globally.  The  study  highlights  persistent  differences  in  fertility  and  family patterns between Eastern and Western Germany, which are often rooted in pre-unifi cation contrasts and can be partly linked to continuing differences in insti-tutional set-up and norms on organised childcare, living arrangements and maternal employment. The remarkable stability in period fertility over the last 30 years (with the  exception  of  Eastern  Germany)  is  illustrated  with  various  indicators  and  dis-cussed on the backdrop of recent reversals in European fer tilit y trends. This st abilit y in fertility levels contrasts with the long-term shift in childbearing towards less sta-ble living arrangements (especially in Eastern Germany), including a high share of single mothers. The study also discusses a relatively small but persistent negative impact of the ongoing shift towards a late timing of childbearing on period fertility in the region. It highlights the educational gradient in fertility, which can be largely attributed to elevated childlessness rates among women with a higher educational degree.  Migrant  women  have  on  average  higher  fertility  rates  than  “native-born”  women,  but  their  net  positive  impact  on  aggregate  fertility  rates  has  diminished  over time and has become negligible in Germany. A concluding discussion suggest s that Austria, Germany and Switzerland share a common pattern of low fertility that sets these countries apart from other regions in Europe}
}
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