Publication


Tretjakova, V., Gedvilaitė-Kordušienė, M., & Rapolienė, G.
Women’s pathways to childlessness in Lithuania
Social Sciences Bulletin, 2020
URL, JabRef BibTex, Abstract
The article explores pathways to childlessness among two generations of women in Lithuania. The authors employ both quantitative and qualitative research methods. For the quantitative part, in order to assess the demographic context of childlessness in Lithuania compared to other European countries the authors analyzed data from Human Fertility Database (HFD) and Generations and Gender Survey (GGS). The authors qualitative analysis is based on semi-structured interviews conducted in Lithuania (n = 44) with childless women aged 28ń47 (younger generation) and 50ń71 (older generation) at the time of the survey (2017ń2018). The authors research results show that compared to other European countries, the level of permanent childlessness in Lithuania seems to be about average: significantly lower than in some Western, Northern and Southern European countries, however, higher than in most Eastern and Central European countries. Long-term trends also indicate increase in permanent childlessness in Lithuania. Analysis of the subjectively perceived causes of childlessness revealed the different ways the two generations of women experience childlessness. In the context of circumstantial childlessness, women from the older generation tend to perceive their childless state as something that has been predetermined, decided by God or fate, whereas, younger women appear to employ a more active approach to their lives in terms of relationships and family formation. In terms of voluntary childlessness, the differences among women of the two generations are even more prominent. Older women never openly say that they have chosen to remain childless, even though they admit never really wanting children. In contrast, narratives of voluntary childlessness among the younger generation are full of clarity, with women openly declaring that it was their choice and that they are enjoying it. Lastly, in the case of involuntary childlessness women ís experiences from both generations seem to converge: they point to dissatisfaction with the healthcare system in the field of infertility treatment.

Reference


@article{Tretjakova2020a,
  author = {Tretjakova, V., Gedvilaitė-Kordušienė, M., & Rapolienė, G.},
  title = {Women’s pathways to childlessness in Lithuania},
  year = {2020},
  journal = {Social Sciences Bulletin},
  pages = {7-21},
  url = {https://vb.lstc.lt/object/elaba:86079712/86079712.pdf},
  timestamp = {25.08.2021},
  abstract = {The article explores pathways to childlessness among two generations of women in Lithuania. The authors employ both quantitative and qualitative research methods. For the quantitative part, in order to assess the demographic context of childlessness in Lithuania compared to other European countries the authors analyzed data from Human Fertility Database (HFD) and Generations and Gender Survey (GGS). The authors qualitative analysis is based on semi-structured interviews conducted in Lithuania (n = 44) with childless women aged 28ń47 (younger generation) and 50ń71 (older generation) at the time of the survey (2017ń2018). The authors research results show that compared to other European countries, the level of permanent childlessness in Lithuania seems to be about average: significantly lower than in some Western, Northern and Southern European countries, however, higher than in most Eastern and Central European countries. Long-term trends also indicate increase in permanent childlessness in Lithuania. Analysis of the subjectively perceived causes of childlessness revealed the different ways the two generations of women experience childlessness. In the context of circumstantial childlessness, women from the older generation tend to perceive their childless state as something that has been predetermined, decided by God or fate, whereas, younger women appear to employ a more active approach to their lives in terms of relationships and family formation.
In terms of voluntary childlessness, the differences among women of the two generations are even more prominent. Older women never openly say that they have chosen to remain childless, even though they admit never really wanting children. In contrast, narratives of voluntary childlessness among the younger generation are full of clarity, with women openly declaring that it was their choice and that they are enjoying it. Lastly, in the case of involuntary childlessness women ís experiences from both generations seem to converge: they point to dissatisfaction with the healthcare system in the field of infertility treatment.
}
}
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