Publication


Mieke C. W. Eeckhaut, Megan M. Sweeney, Jessica D. Gipson
Who Is Using Long-Acting Reversible Contraceptive Methods? Findings from Nine Low-Fertility Countries
Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, 2014
URL, JabRef BibTex, Abstract
Long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods—IUDs and implants—are more effective than other reversible methods, yet are little used in the United States. Examining which U.S. women use LARC methods and how they differ from users in other low-fertility countries may help point the way toward increasing use. METHODS: Data from married or cohabiting women participating in the National Survey of Family Growth (2008–2010) and in eight countries’ Generations and Gender Programme surveys (2004–2010) were used in bivariate and multinomial logistic regression analyses examining LARC use within each setting. RESULTS: Data from married or cohabiting women participating in the National Survey of Family Growth (2008–2010) and in eight countries’ Generations and Gender Programme surveys (2004–2010) were used in bivariate and multinomial logistic regression analyses examining LARC use within each setting. CONCLUSIONS: Certain subgroups of U.S. women may benefit from the reversibility and effectiveness of LARC methods.

Reference


@article{Eeckhaut2014a,
  author = {Mieke C. W. Eeckhaut, Megan M. Sweeney, Jessica D. Gipson},
  title = {Who Is Using Long-Acting Reversible Contraceptive Methods? Findings from Nine Low-Fertility Countries},
  year = {2014},
  journal = {Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health},
  volume = {46},
  number = {2},
  month = {Jul},
  url = {http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1363/46e1914/pdf},
  timestamp = {22.08.2014},
  abstract = {Long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods—IUDs and implants—are more effective than other reversible methods, yet are little used in the United States. Examining which U.S. women use LARC methods and how they differ from users in other low-fertility countries may help point the way toward increasing use. METHODS: Data from married or cohabiting women participating in the National Survey of Family Growth (2008–2010) and in eight countries’ Generations and Gender Programme surveys (2004–2010) were used in bivariate and multinomial logistic regression analyses examining LARC use within each setting. RESULTS: Data from married or cohabiting women participating in the National Survey of Family Growth (2008–2010) and in eight countries’ Generations and Gender Programme surveys (2004–2010) were used in bivariate and multinomial logistic regression analyses examining LARC use within each setting. CONCLUSIONS: Certain subgroups of U.S. women may benefit from the reversibility and effectiveness of LARC methods.}
}
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