Publication


Ausra Maslauskaite
The Developmental Trends of Cohabitation in Lithuanian Society
Institute for Social Research, 2012
URL, JabRef BibTex, Abstract
Cohabitation as a first partnership is considered the key indicator of the ‘modern’ family and is associated with such demographic features of ‘modern’ family as postponement of marriage, decline in fertility, increase in non-marital childbearing and increase in divorce rates. The emergence of the contemporary cohabitations and the structural and cultural forces underlying this process are conceptualized in the theory of the second demographic transition (van de Kaa 1988; 2004). There is a large body of scientific evidence on the onset and trends in the development of cohabitations in the countries of North America, North, South and West Europe. The research proves the diversity of the developmental trends of cohabitations across and within the individual countries of these regions. There have been several attempts to summarize these developments and to produce a theoretical scheme that would capture the developmental stages of cohabitation (Prinz 1995; Rindfuss, Van denHeuvel 1999; Casper, Bianchi, 2002; Heuvelin, Timberlike, 2004; Kiernan 2004). One of the recent attempts belongs to Sobotka and Toulemon (Sobotka, Toulemon 2008). These authors distinguish three main stages that describe the development of cohabitation in Europe: diffusion, permanency and cohabitation as a family arrangement (Sobotka, Toulemon 2008: 99).

Reference


@article{Maslauskaite2012,
  author = {Ausra Maslauskaite},
  title = {The Developmental Trends of Cohabitation in Lithuanian Society},
  year = {2012},
  journal = {Institute for Social Research},
  number = {1},
  pages = {102-120},
  url = {http://paa2011.princeton.edu/papers/110815},
  timestamp = {14.05.2013},
  owner = {Coleman},
  abstract = {Cohabitation as a first partnership is considered the key indicator of the ‘modern’ family and is associated with such demographic features of ‘modern’ family as postponement of marriage, decline in fertility, increase in non-marital childbearing and increase in divorce rates. The emergence of the contemporary cohabitations and the structural and cultural forces underlying this process are conceptualized in the theory of the second demographic transition (van de Kaa 1988; 2004). There is a large body of scientific evidence on the onset and trends in the development of cohabitations in the countries of North America, North, South and West Europe. The research proves the diversity of the developmental trends of cohabitations across and within the individual countries of these regions. There have been several attempts to summarize these developments and to produce a theoretical scheme that would capture the developmental stages of cohabitation (Prinz 1995; Rindfuss, Van denHeuvel 1999; Casper, Bianchi, 2002; Heuvelin, Timberlike, 2004; Kiernan 2004). One of the recent attempts belongs to Sobotka and Toulemon (Sobotka, Toulemon 2008). These authors distinguish three main stages that describe the development of cohabitation in Europe: diffusion, permanency and cohabitation as a family arrangement (Sobotka, Toulemon 2008: 99).}
}

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