Publication


Solaz, A.
"Once but not twice": partnership histories and division of housework
30th International Association for Time Use Research Conference: Advances in Time Use Research: Methods, Analysis & Applications, 2008,
URL, JabRef BibTex, Abstract
This article addresses the following main question: are second unions more egalitarian than first ones? The research issue is approached from the economic perspective of specialization within marriage. For the New Home Economics, specialization remains one of the main determinants of marriage gain. However, a high degree of specialization becomes dangerous in case of divorce since it increases the divorce cost: the exchange of marriage-specific skills is no longer possible and the partner specialized in home production, generally the woman, may loose human capital. Divorced fathers may also have difficulties coping with new parental tasks. From a methodological point of view, comparing division of housework in first and second unions is difficult since the inadequate data (no available panel data on time use, and usually no information on marital history in time-use data). For our research we use a French demographic survey, ERFI-GGS, with subjective data on division of housework. Since, assortive mating is also different in first and second union, we correct for the endogeneity of first union failure (by parents’ divorce). Results show that division of housework may be correctly measured by subjective indicators if we control for respondent's sex and presence of partner during the interview. Three indicators of inequality are used in domestic, parental tasks and decision processes. Secondly, we show that specialization increases with union duration. Lastly, second unions seem more egalitarian for division of housework, all other things being equal, but sharing of parental tasks and decision-making are similar in first and second unions.

Reference


@inproceedings{Solaz2008c,
  author = {Solaz, A.},
  title = {"Once but not twice": partnership histories and division of housework},
  year = {2008},
  booktitle = {30th International Association for Time Use Research Conference: Advances in Time Use Research: Methods, Analysis & Applications},
  month = {Dec},
  url = {http://www-2009.timeuse.org/information/documents/IATUR-2008-abstract-booklet.doc},
  timestamp = {28.09.2011},
  owner = {Andrei},
  language = {English},
  address = {Sydney, Australia},
  organization = {International Association for Time Use Research},
  abstract = {This article addresses the following main question: are second unions more egalitarian than first ones? The research issue is approached from the economic perspective of specialization within marriage. For the New Home Economics, specialization remains one of the main determinants of marriage gain. However, a high degree of specialization becomes dangerous in case of divorce since it increases the divorce cost: the exchange of marriage-specific skills is no longer possible and the partner specialized in home production, generally the woman, may loose human capital. Divorced fathers may also have difficulties coping with new parental tasks. From a methodological point of view, comparing division of housework in first and second unions is difficult since the inadequate data (no available panel data on time use, and usually no information on marital history in time-use data). For our research we use a French demographic survey, ERFI-GGS, with subjective data on division of housework. Since, assortive mating is also different in first and second union, we correct for the endogeneity of first union failure (by parents’ divorce). Results show that division of housework may be correctly measured by subjective indicators if we control for respondent's sex and presence of partner during the interview. Three indicators of inequality are used in domestic, parental tasks and decision processes. Secondly, we show that specialization increases with union duration. Lastly, second unions seem more egalitarian for division of housework, all other things being equal, but sharing of parental tasks and decision-making are similar in first and second unions.}
}

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