Publication


Isabella Buber-Ennser
Attrition in the Austrian Generations and Gender Survey: Is there a bias by fertility-relevant aspects?
Demographic Research, 2014
URL, JabRef BibTex, Abstract
BACKGROUND In longitudinal research, the loss of sample members between waves is a possible source of bias. It is therefore crucial to analyse attrition. OBJECTIVE This paper analyses attrition in a longitudinal study on family and fertility, by distinguishing between attrition due to non-contact and attrition due to non-cooperation. METHODS Based on the first two waves of the Austrian Generations and Gender Survey, the two components of attrition are studied separately by using bivariate as well as multivariate methods. Moreover, overall dropout—the combination of both components—is analysed. Apart from various socio-economic characteristics and data collection information, the study focuses on fertility-relevant variables such as fecundity, fertility intentions, sexual orientation and traditional attitudes. RESULTS Fecundity, fertility intentions and homosexual relationship are associated with higher attrition due to non-cooperation in bivariate analyses but have no explanatory power in the multivariate model. Pregnancy and traditional attitudes towards marriage are associated with significantly lower attrition due to non-cooperation in the multivariate context. Overall dropout is significantly lower only among persons with traditional attitudes towards marriage, although small in size and statistical significance. Moreover, various individual and regional characteristics are significantly associated with dropout, with differences between attrition due to non-contact und attrition due to non-cooperation. CONCLUSIONS Detailed insights into attrition are important when using longitudinal data and interpreting results, but also for the design of future data collections. The Austrian GGS panel has a relatively low dropout (22 per cent) and is affected by a small bias towards family-oriented persons as well as less educated respondents and persons with migration background but the data can be used without (larger) concern about selectivity.

Reference


@article{Buber-Ennser2014b,
  author = {Isabella Buber-Ennser},
  title = {Attrition in the Austrian Generations and Gender Survey: Is there a bias by fertility-relevant aspects? },
  year = {2014},
  journal = {Demographic Research},
  volume = {31},
  number = {16},
  pages = {459-496},
  month = {Aug},
  url = {http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol31/16/31-16.pdf},
  timestamp = {25.08.2014},
  abstract = {BACKGROUND
In longitudinal research, the loss of sample members between waves is a possible source of bias. It is therefore crucial to analyse attrition.

OBJECTIVE
This paper analyses attrition in a longitudinal study on family and fertility, by distinguishing between attrition due to non-contact and attrition due to non-cooperation.

METHODS
Based on the first two waves of the Austrian Generations and Gender Survey, the two components of attrition are studied separately by using bivariate as well as multivariate methods. Moreover, overall dropout—the combination of both components—is analysed. Apart from various socio-economic characteristics and data collection information, the study focuses on fertility-relevant variables such as fecundity, fertility intentions, sexual orientation and traditional attitudes. 

RESULTS
Fecundity, fertility intentions and homosexual relationship are associated with higher attrition due to non-cooperation in bivariate analyses but have no explanatory power in the multivariate model. Pregnancy and traditional attitudes towards marriage are associated with significantly lower attrition due to non-cooperation in the multivariate context. Overall dropout is significantly lower only among persons with traditional attitudes towards marriage, although small in size and statistical significance. Moreover, various individual and regional characteristics are significantly associated with dropout, with differences between attrition due to non-contact und attrition due to non-cooperation. 

CONCLUSIONS
Detailed insights into attrition are important when using longitudinal data and interpreting results, but also for the design of future data collections. The Austrian GGS panel has a relatively low dropout (22 per cent) and is affected by a small bias towards family-oriented persons as well as less educated respondents and persons with migration background but the data can be used without (larger) concern about selectivity. 
}
}

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