Publication


Muresan Cornelia
Parental breakup and long-term consequences on support behaviour to aging parents in Europe
Social Work Review - Revista de Asistență Socială, 2017
URL, JabRef BibTex, Abstract
With rising parental divorce and union instability, the number of children growing up without both their biological parents increases continuously, and this could generate both weaker filial responsibilities and less actual support given to aging parents. Thus, divorced parents may become more vulnerable in their old age than those from intact families. Adopting a life‑course perspective, this study aims to investigate how parental breakup influences filial responsibility and helping behaviour of adult offspring. Using Generations and Gender Surveys data from ten European countries (7 from Central and Eastern and 3 from Western Europe) we model, first, the strength of filial norms among adult children and, then, the actual support given to mothers and fathers taken separately. Our main hypothesis is that family experience during childhood has an impact both on filial responsibilities and on helping behaviour, but mothers benefit more of the actual support. We distinguish between three types of support offered (practical, material and emotional) and we look for other known determinants, such as: children's own family situation, their personal characteristics (age, education and religiosity) and practical possibilities (health problems, employment, time distance to parents' residence, number of living siblings). Parental needs and actual support received from parents are also investigated. Our results show that norms of filial obligation weaken if children experience parental breakup, while the helping behaviour is affected in a more complex way. Only instrumental care to divorced aging fathers is negatively affected, but no other types of support toward them are diminished. On the contrary, we witness rather strengthening emotional ties with both divorced parents, and increased willingness to helping financially divorced mothers. Neither instrumental care for mothers nor financial help to fathers are affected (positively or negatively) by the parental divorce.

Reference


@article{Cornelia2017a,
  author = {Muresan Cornelia},
  title = {Parental breakup and long-term consequences on support behaviour to aging parents in Europe},
  year = {2017},
  journal = {Social Work Review - Revista de Asistență Socială},
  volume = {XVI},
  number = {1},
  pages = {93-105},
  url = {http://www.swreview.ro/index.pl/parental_break_up_and_long_term_consequences_on_support_behavior_to_aging_parents_in_europe?caut=Muresan},
  timestamp = {31.08.2018},
  abstract = {With rising parental divorce and union instability, the number of children growing up without both their biological parents increases continuously, and this could generate both weaker filial responsibilities and less actual support given to aging parents. Thus, divorced parents may become more vulnerable in their old age than those from intact families. Adopting a life‑course perspective, this study aims to investigate how parental breakup influences filial responsibility and helping behaviour of adult offspring. Using Generations and Gender Surveys data from ten European countries (7 from Central and Eastern and 3 from Western Europe) we model, first, the strength of filial norms among adult children and, then, the actual support given to mothers and fathers taken separately. Our main hypothesis is that family experience during childhood has an impact both on filial responsibilities and on helping behaviour, but mothers benefit more of the actual support. We distinguish between three types of support offered (practical, material and emotional) and we look for other known determinants, such as: children's own family situation, their personal characteristics (age, education and religiosity) and practical possibilities (health problems, employment, time distance to parents' residence, number of living siblings). Parental needs and actual support received from parents are also investigated. Our results show that norms of filial obligation weaken if children experience parental breakup, while the helping behaviour is affected in a more complex way. Only instrumental care to divorced aging fathers is negatively affected, but no other types of support toward them are diminished. On the contrary, we witness rather strengthening emotional ties with both divorced parents, and increased willingness to helping financially divorced mothers. Neither instrumental care for mothers nor financial help to fathers are affected (positively or negatively) by the parental divorce.}
}
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